CyanogenMod Reaches 10 Million Devices, Oppo N1 CM Edition Gets a Promo Video

Despite Google’s best efforts, some smartphone and tablet manufacturers are perfectly content to allow their devices to languish, never to receive the latest version of Android through any sort of official channel. That’s where Cyanogen, Inc. comes in: the newly incorporated company promises customized versions of Android that, in addition to providing the latest AOSP has to offer, are much more feature-rich than OEM firmware. Installation of CyanogenMod software requires a compatible device and foreknowledge of certain dev tools, of course, but it remains the most consumer-friendly third-party ROM available.

Apparently, the promise of Android updates is attractive to a vast number of smartphone and tablet users: more than 10 million devices are running the ROM. That’s according to a Google+ post by Steve Kondik, CTO of CyanogenMod.

To clarify, 10 million is an estimate; only users who voluntarily report activity via CMStats, a built-in analytic service, are counted. Still, the number is impressive, and certainly an indication that the desire for aftermarket Android solutions is growing.

Perhaps in celebration of the milestone (and the additional $23 million in funding they just took in), Cyanogen took to YouTube to promote the Oppo N1, the first-ever CyanogenMod-certified smartphone. Launching December 24, it’s the fledgling company’s first attempt to translate its software success to the hardware business. As you can imagine, we’ll be keeping a keen eye on this first phone attempt, as well as any others that come through this ROM-turned-corporate entity.

 

 

Source: Droid Life

Koush Releases AllCast App To Google Play, Brings Local Video Casting To Many Devices

Android developer Koushik Dutta, of CyanogenMod and ClockWorkMod fame, announced today the arrival of his new AllCast application onto Google Play. Previously in beta, the app allows local media content to be pushed to a wealth of popular devices, like new Xbox consoles, Roku 3, and Apple TV. Google’s Chromecast remains unsupported in the app due to Google’s continuing developer limitations, which have been documented quite publicly since the HDMI dongle’s release this past summer. Koush could only say that he “hopes” Chromecast support will arrive some day.

Here is the full list of currently compatible devices:

  • Roku
  • Apple TV
  • Xbox 360, Xbox One
  • Samsung Smart TVs
  • Panasonic Smart TVs
  • Google TV (Logitech Revue, etc)
  • DLNA Renderers

The app does not require root access and is free on the Play Store, with a $4.99 in-app purchase to unlock the “premium” version, which removes ads along with some casting limitations.

Go grab it!

 

Download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.koushikdutta.cast

CyanogenMod Raises Another $23 Million in Funding, Looking to Hire Squad of New Engineers

Steve Kondik, Cyanogen Inc’s CTO, took to the official CyanogenMod blog today, announcing that the group has received another $23 million in funding, led by Andreessen Horowitz, bringing the total amount of capital to about $30 million. Pretty impressive for a group of dudes that started making custom ROMs a few years ago. With the second round of funding under way, the team is apparently getting ready to hire new staff “like crazy.”

Kondik did a very good job at laying out the first step Cyanogen is going to take with the cash flow through his blog post, and we have gone ahead and posted an excerpt from it below.

This new influx of capital will primarily be used to grow our engineering team as well as our UX, design, and product teams so that we can continue to build the next generation of mobile experience.

What does this mean for you as a CM user? Not much yet, except that you’ll see more new things from us more often. We will continue to invest in the community by way of increased resources, sponsoring more events, and of course staying open. You’ll see new apps and features from us, new services, and also more devices which run CM out of the box.

Do you love Android and open source? We are looking for great designers and software engineers to make it happen. Visit http://cyngn.com/careers if you want to be a part of of the new revolution in mobile!
If you think you have what it takes to be a part of CM, definitely hit up that Careers link.

 

 

Source: Droid Life

CyanogenMod Installer Removed From Play Store At Google’s Insistence, Still Available For Sideloading

 

As part of an effort to expand adoption of CyanogenMod, the developers recently released the CyanogenMod Installer app in Google Play. All was well for a few weeks, but today Google contacted the CyanogenMod team to explain that the installer app was in violation of Google Play’s policies. So, the CM folks agreed to take the app down.

The app acts as a tool to help users get their devices connected to a computer over ADB – it doesn’t actually do any of the heavy lifting of unlocking and flashing the device. All that is handled by the desktop client that connects over ADB. Google’s rationale for the removal was that the CM Installer app ‘encourages users to void their warranty,’ which is unacceptable even if it doesn’t technically violate a rule (see update below). Of course, by that logic most root-only apps and tools encourage people to void warranties.

The installer app is still available for download on the CM site when people click “Get Started.” It can be sideloaded like any other app after Unknown Sources is enabled in the settings. CyanogenMod is also submitting the app to the Amazon and Samsung app stores, where it will probably be rejected. Apparently it’s harder to go legit that we thought.

Note, the app may still show up with a direct link for a while, but it’s already gone from search results.

Update: According to the CM blog post, Google as much as admitted the app wasn’t violating the letter of the law, but was still going to be removed. The developer agreement specifically gives Google broad authority to remove material from Google Play “at its sole discretion.” The document uses the phrase several times in section 7.2 to make the point. This section also refers to Google’s agreements with carriers and OEMs superseding those made with developers. That may be part of the issue as well.

Update 2: Koushik Dutta has just linked to the newly released source code for the app on Google+, but as he points out, it’s nothing groundbreaking.

Update, the third: CM updated their blog post to remove the assertion that Google told the team that the app was not technically in violation of the TOS. The post says that was a “mischaracterization of Google’s statement.”

 

 

Source: Android Police

[New App] CyanogenMod Installer

After a bit of testing, the CyanogenMod Installer app has hit Google Play for everyone. When combined with the desktop client (and a USB cable), this becomes the fastest way to install CyanogenMod. It won’t work on every phone, but it completely automates things on supported devices.

The app is basically a guide for preparing your phone to be detected and flashed by the desktop client, which does all the heavy lifting. You don’t need to be rooted or unlocked before using the installer – it’ll take care of everything for you. Since the process involves unlocking the bootloader, not all devices are supported. You can see the full list of supported phones as of now on the CyanogenMod wiki. It includes Nexus devices, of course, but also a number of recent Samsung devices and most HTC One variants. Missing are all Verizon phones (except for the Gnex), which are locked down more tightly.

If you’ve got a supported device, this is a fine way to get on the custom ROM train. CyanogenMod has a pretty streamlined update system, so you won’t need to muck around in recovery mode to keep things up to date.

Update: The desktop client is live on the CM website now.

 

Download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.cyanogenmod.oneclick

CyanogenMod Announces Cid, the Final Version of the New Mascot

Damn, that was fast! Yesterday we showed you what was to be the starting point of the new CyanogenMod mascot, rAndy. The CM team put out an open call for mascot ideas and rAndy was the the teams final choice. When announcing their decision they had said that they were going to be working with the artist to fine tune the little guy before making any finalization’s and would let us know when he is ready for the mainstream. Enter Cid, the final design for the new CM mascot and it only took a day to get him whipped into shape.

Cid (Pronounced: /si:d/):
When we started brainstorming names we wanted to pick something short, simple and fitting for the new mascot. Obviously trying to stray away from the *droid or *Andy type names we decided to pay homage to D.A.R.Y.L., B.O.B Maximillion or V.I.N.Cent and create a name that could also be an acronym.

We chose C.I.D. which is short for Cyanogenmod ID, the common thread that all CyanogenMod users share; each user’s unique place in our community.

Some of you may also be familiar with the concept of the “id”, the instinctual driving force behind our personalities. It seemed fitting, that this chaotic force and need for immediate gratification, was incorporated into the image of a OS which strives to be on the bleeding edge of Android development.

Thus C.I.D became Cid.

Alright, sounds good to me! Although I was partially attached to the cool looking owl entry they had, and apparently that was actually one of the designs that was hotly debated over. Either way I am cool with Cid and I look forward to seeing his cute little mug on a CM boot animation in the near future. What about you guys? Are you down with Cid? Tell me all about it in the comments below.

CyanogenMod Team Officially Selects Its New Mascot

CyanogenMod officially has a new mascot to call its own after its extensive mascot search. Developed by Caio Alves, the new mascot will be tentatively named ‘rAndy‘. It will go through a few additional and minor tweaks before the CM team officially unleashes the new image of the CM name into the wild. Ladies and gentlemen, the CM name much like Android is all set for its continued evolution.