[New Game] Ride ‘Em Rigby Is An Endless Runner From Cartoon Network Featuring Unicorns Riding Fast Cars

You probably didn’t wake up this morning thinking you need another endless runner in your life. I sure didn’t. But if you’re a Regular Show fan, then that alone may be enough reason to pay attention to Cartoon Network’s latest Android game. If not, then maybe you will be enticed by the unicorns riding fast cars. I mean, why wouldn’t you be?

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Now that I’ve piqued your interest, let’s go over the details (don’t worry, this is an endless runner, so there really isn’t much). You play as Rigby, who must hang on to Muscle Man for dear life as he speeds through the park on all fours. There are twenty levels filled with collectibles and power-ups (such as the unicorns). The controls are simple, and the difficulty ramps up as you go. More importantly, the game costs just 99 cents, and there are no in-app purchases. That alone sets Ride ‘Em Rigby apart from most endless runners.

That and unicorns in dragsters.

Google Play Link

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Google Play All Access Subscribers Begin Receiving Google Glass Invites

 

It wasn’t that long ago Google added support for Play Music within Glass, and, what with the release of the studio earbud accessory, it seemed only appropriate that Google celebrate in a manner befitting of music aficionados everywhere.

Today, Google Play Music All Access subscribers began receiving e-mail invitations to join the Google Glass Explorers program. The asking price of $1,500 hasn’t changed, unfortunately, but at least those who can afford Google’s heads-up computer finally have an opportunity to purchase it.

The expansion of the Explorers program can only mean one thing: Google’s ramping up production of Glass. They may not be a sign of imminent release, but especially big, recent Glass developments – including a massive software update and support for prescription glasses – signal exciting things to come.

 

 

Source: Droid Life

Awesome Infographic: HTC Shows Us “The Anatomy of an Android OS Update” From PDK to OTA

Ever wonder what the entire process of an Android update looks like? How and when do carriers get involved? Who are all of the players? How much quicker or fewer steps are there for developer or Google Play editions? When do manufacturers see the newest version of Android? All of that can be found in a lengthy infographic that HTC posted their Software Updates page, a spot that gives the status on current HTC phones and when they plan to push updates to them.

The image takes you on a journey of three different device types: carrier, unlocked/developer, and Google Play edition. You’ll see where an update can get caught up in the system, how much easier it is for HTC to get updates ready for non-carrier phones, and more.

You can find the entire infographic below, but I found a couple of points in particular interesting:

  • According to HTC’s count, Developer/unlocked and Google Play edition devices see 3 and 4 fewer steps through an update life cycle than carrier-tied devices do.
  • Chipset manufacturers have a lot more say in updates than I think any of us ever consider. Should one of them decide that their chipsets won’t work well with a new version of Android, there is a chance that that particular phone is done for good with no new drivers made available.
  • Even though most phone OEMs are making single devices that hit each carrier, there is still a lot of carrier customization done in terms of software that takes time during the process, especially should one not approve an initial build.
  • OEMs are receiving a Platform Developer Kit (PDK), however, they get new Android version source when the rest of us do, which is not until Google makes it available.

 

If you sneak over to HTC’s new status update page, you’ll see how the carrier-tied versions of HTC One are coming along through the process. At this point, HTC would put them in the “Integration” stage which means the update has a ways to go. The “Integration” stage is where HTC works with carriers to decide if any software modifications are needed before implementing them, doing internal testing, letting carriers test, and then hopefully getting final approval for a push.

Also, you may want to bookmark that page.

 

Source: Droid Life

Dolphin Zero is a Browser for the Privacy-Conscious

Need to clandestinely browse the web? We all do from time to time, but if manually clearing browsing data takes too much effort, there’s Dolphin Zero, an app for Android from the creators of Dolphin Browser. Essentially a stripped-down version of Dolphin with a focus on privacy, Dolphin Zero does not retain the information internet browsers typically do; things like history, form data, passwords, and cookies are deleted automatically. To further protect from unwanted data collection, the built-in search function directs queries to the privacy-conscious DuckDuckGo, and “Do Not Track” flags are enabled by default.

Assuming you have a device running Android 2.2 or later, Dolphin Zero can be downloaded for free from the Play Store.

 

Google Play Link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dolphin.browser.zero

Koush Releases AllCast App To Google Play, Brings Local Video Casting To Many Devices

Android developer Koushik Dutta, of CyanogenMod and ClockWorkMod fame, announced today the arrival of his new AllCast application onto Google Play. Previously in beta, the app allows local media content to be pushed to a wealth of popular devices, like new Xbox consoles, Roku 3, and Apple TV. Google’s Chromecast remains unsupported in the app due to Google’s continuing developer limitations, which have been documented quite publicly since the HDMI dongle’s release this past summer. Koush could only say that he “hopes” Chromecast support will arrive some day.

Here is the full list of currently compatible devices:

  • Roku
  • Apple TV
  • Xbox 360, Xbox One
  • Samsung Smart TVs
  • Panasonic Smart TVs
  • Google TV (Logitech Revue, etc)
  • DLNA Renderers

The app does not require root access and is free on the Play Store, with a $4.99 in-app purchase to unlock the “premium” version, which removes ads along with some casting limitations.

Go grab it!

 

Download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.koushikdutta.cast

So, the Nexus Q Sort of Still Lives, Gets Unofficial Kit Kat Build

That big, beautiful, overpriced, never-could-do-much-before-Google-killed-it-anyway, sexy orb-ish ball sitting at the top of this post isn’t quite dead yet. The Nexus Q does indeed unofficially live on for the couple of thousand people who still own them or at least have one sitting around the house being put to use as a weighted object. Thanks to developers, an “unofficial” build of Kit Kat (Android 4.4) “based on CM11 from repo sync” has been ported over to the device. Yes, Kit Kat on the Nexus Q!

The build is said to be “experimental,” but the only issues listed are sporadic stuttering here and there in Google Play Music and the inability to install Chrome through the Play Store. Since this is Android, you can sideload the .apk just fine. And uh, that’s pretty much it. The magical mystery ball known as the Nexus Q is half-way alive and well should tinkering be of interest.

In order to get yourself into some Nexus Q Kit Kat, you’ll have to know adb commands and how to boot a custom recovery, flash a couple of .zip files.

Speaking of the Q, and I know this will never happen, but why can’t Google issue it one more update to turn it into a Chromecast or something? It probably doesn’t make sense to spend the resources on an individual or two to make that happen, but all I’m asking for is one last update to at least give it functionality again. Then forget it forever. There are a few of us out there who still want to use it, have speakers that work wonderfully with it, and could get extra Google service use through it should it work.

 

 

Source: Droid Life

[New Game] No Brakes Valet

The titular valet in No Brakes Valet isn’t quite as bad as the famous garage attendant from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. He is, in fact, a professional. And he’d be well on his way to the Valet Hall Of Fame… if it weren’t for an apparently religious opposition to using the brake pedal. It’s the sort of minor personal hang-up that can really sink a career in vehicular services.

No Brakes Valet was originally an OUYA title, though it comes from slightly notable indie developer Captain Games, of Enviro-Bear 2010 and BEEFWAR fame. The objective is to park a series of cars in a tiny parking lot without using brakes. To say that the game is difficult is to miss an opportunity to use adjectives like “soul-crushing” and “digitally cruel,” but it’s all in a sense of fender-bending fun, spurred on by the developer’s standard Microsoft Paint graphics. That said, moving from a controller to a touchscreen can’t do No Brakes Valet any favors.

Most cars can (and will) be parked anywhere, but you’ll get a curveball every once in a while with a dignitary or a handicapped parking space. Road hazards include buildings, water traps, and moose. You’ll need a keen eye for physics and a distinct lack of concern for other people’s property to win. No Brakes Valet is a reasonable $3 on the Play Store with no in-app purchases.

 

Download: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.expb.valet